Skip to Content

If you want to make a name for yourself, write daily. Writing is where everything starts. Don’t like to write? It doesn’t matter. Even the great writers don’t always enjoy writing. Don’t have anything to say? It also doesn’t matter: You don’t write because you have something to say. You write to find out what you have to say.

For creative people like us, perfectionism is the bane of our existence. On the one hand, this obsession with perfection is what makes our work so good but on the other hand, it can be downright paralyzing.

You have good taste and high standards. That’s often why what you make frustrates you. You know that it’s not yet aligning with the image of perfection in your mind.

I share my formula for making perfectionism work for you instead of against you. The video is based off of a chapter of my book, The Overlap Technique.

Relationship marketing does work, but the difficulty is it also attracts freeloaders. Now, the fact that freeloaders exist is not the difficulty—there will always be freeloaders. The difficulty lies in struggling with your inner response to freeloaders.

Something a little different from usual. I’ve been working on setting up my new Mac Pro. It’s actually not so noticeable in the picture since it’s so small (which I like). But man, that thing packs a punch.

I’m doing a lot more heavy production work with my podcast and shooting and editing my weekly video show, and my old iMac was just beach balls all day—no good. It was time to step it up and get a machine that doesn’t have to think about what I need it to do.

Wow, does this thing deliver. I’m a power user, so I have a dozen+ items that I absolutely have to have in my startup. It was taking minutes to boot on my old machine. Now (with the same exact configuration), I enter my password and everything is fully loaded by the time I count to 2. Apps open in even less time. Amazing.

When your car breaks down on the way to an important event that begins in 1 hour, and roadside assistance is not going to make it in time, who do you call?

Your best friend.

Your best friend is always there for you. They’ve got your back. No matter what they have going on, no matter how busy they are, if you need them, they’re there. No questions asked.

Everywhere you look online, you see little counters. Everything is “likable” and every “like” inflates a counter. But what does the counter mean? What does it represent? Does it convey value? Is it an indication of worth?

I’ve been having some very real conversations with a few of my close friends. What I’ve found is that we have common struggles. Notoriety on the internet is such a strange thing and if we’re not careful, we can easily get caught up in the whirlwind of acclamation.

In today’s podcast I talked about my immensely successful launch of Learn Lettering. During the recording, I recalled an email newsletter that I sent out a couple months back that was very relevant.

I hadn’t shared the email anywhere except on my newsletter, but I promised in the podcast that I would publish it as a blog post so you could read it.

We look at defining whitespace containers and establish kerning principles to be applied to lettering compositions in the following lesson. This is the last of the free lessons before the full Learn Lettering courses are available on Monday, March 24th! I’ll be launching with 10 courses, 50 lessons, and more than 8 hours of highly edited, educational videos on lettering.

It’s hard to believe we’re finally closing in on the final week. This Monday, March 24th, Learn Lettering will finally be live with 10 courses, 50 lessons, and more than 8 hours of highly edited, educational videos on lettering.

Since 2012 I’ve been planning this, and for the past 8 months I’ve been exclusively building this platform. I phased out of client work in 2013 to make this a reality, and now we’re just days away. I can hardly contain my excitement.

Those of you who heard my recent talk on The Overlap Technique know that I like to do things a bit differently. I began challenging the status quo vocationally, but beyond that I began to question common practices in all facets of what I do. I starting asking the “Why?” question instead of taking things at face value and doing things everyone did “because that’s what you do.”

I’m quite used to the glorious real estate of my 27-inch screen. I even have a second monitor in addition to it. I’m used to my space. I like it for designing and I like it for the nice at-a-glance overview it gives me of all the things I’m managing.

However, with all of the space comes to tendency for distraction. Yes, 27 inches and two monitors can be used productively and for good. But they can so easily be used to facilitate heavily efficient distraction management.

I’ll be teaching a hand lettering workshop in Florida for AIGA Orlando on February 22, 2014.

We will explore some approaches for creating different types of lettering, as well as look at how to intentionally combine different styles and create solid compositions.

Freelancers & Entrepreneurs Serious About Growing Their Business.

From clients and professionalism to products and marketing: get feedback on your work and help with growing your online business. We go deeper on the topics discussed in the podcast and dive into discussions on business, design, and more.

We’ve got a special podcast episode coming up soon! This coming Monday, we’re holding a streaming video event with live chat. We’ll be joined by our spouses to tackle some podcast feedback with real questions from listeners we’ve received, like these…

This past week, I had some really good conversations. It’s amazing what a little perspective can do for you when you make time to connect with people and really listen. It’s so easy to get trapped in the reverberation of our own thoughts.

I won’t detail each conversation individually, but I will pull out some of the principles and things that stuck with me this week.

If you’re like me, you’re afraid of being vulnerable. I know I’m especially afraid of being vulnerable on the internet. We believe it to be synonymous with weakness—and no one wants to appear weak. We painstakingly craft our online personas into an ideal image because it provides us a sense of security and control.

I honestly didn’t even like putting a picture of myself as my avatar. It would be much easier to hide behind an icon or logo. I hated the sound of my own voice, I certainly didn’t want to be on video, and let’s not even talk about speaking in front of a crowd!