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There was a discussion in the Community chat this morning:

“Hey, haven’t seen you in awhile! Busy with work or busy with life?”
“Busy with both work and life!”

Now I know he’s just talking about his job and family, but I tend to reflect deeply without much provocation.

To me, the meaning and definition of words is an important matter. The use of “work” and “life” here in this context got me thinking.

Our culture believes that work is the opposite of play…

Here’s the truth: I struggle every time I have to show up.

Every time I need to write a new blog post, record a new podcast, or prepare a newsletter—it’s tough for me.

You don’t really ever get to a point where your first iteration of any new thing you make is perfect. It’s always a process. It always takes effort, sweat, and trudging through a lot of failed attempts.

You’re always going to be met with a blank page.

I’ll be honest with you: I have a hard time slowing down.

As an entrepreneur, the work is never done. There is always more that can be done and there is always something left to do.

Where does work end and play begin? This line is even more challenging to define when your job is what you love to do.

What do you do in the evenings?

Doing what you’re passionate about for a living is a lovely idea. But everyone has bills to pay.

We all know someone who quit their job to pursue their passion and ended up hating what they do because it “became a job” to them.

What happened here?

Motivation is a strange concept. We’re motivated by many things. We’re motivated when we’re excited, when we’re scared, and when we’re determined.

It seems like the will to do many things comes naturally but when actively sought, motivation appears to make itself scarce.

You would think we could reverse engineer motivation.

But motivation isn’t something you can conjure on a whim. You can’t fabricate motivation, you have to foster it.

What if you took a moment out of every day to step back from your work and really think about it?
What if you were really purposeful about evaluating what you’re doing daily and where you’re at?
What if every 7th day, you took a whole day off to do the same thing on a slightly larger scale?

Let’s take it a step further…

What if you took off 1 whole week every 7 weeks?

You’re starting to realize that while writing blog posts is nice, and engaging with your audience on Facebook and Twitter is great, you really need to start expanding and reaching your audience in new and more engaging ways that will hold their attention for more than a few seconds.

Right now, podcasts and videos are big. But which one is better? What should you branch out to next?

It’s a big world.

A world big enough that opportunity and possibility are nearly limitless, but also so big that we can easily become overwhelmed.

In a world of 7 billion people, is any thought truly unique? Are there any original ideas anymore? Who am I to even try and why should my contribution matter?

This past week, I was interviewed by my friend, Nathan Barry, who just launched his new podcast. He was kind enough to have me on for the 3rd episode of his show: Profiting From Teaching With Sean McCabe.

I share this with you because Nathan is incredibly transparent with his all of his work, process, writing, and product launch revenues.

If you’ve been a long-time subscriber, you know that I’m a huge fan of transparency. My goal is to share everything I know and everything I’ve learned in hopes that it helps you in some way. I’m not worried to give freely because I know it comes back and I’ve known Nathan to have the same mentality.

What you’re about to hear is a completely wide open interview where I hold nothing back and share explicit details and real numbers.

An email came in and it was my worst nightmare: “I was curious what your refund policy was like?” Someone had finally asked the dreaded question. The problem? I didn’t have a refund policy. My awkward reply went something like this:“Due to the electronic nature of the product, purchases are non-refundable.” Yeah, real smooth. Let’s  Continue Reading »

Look, I don’t care if you stub your toe and loose a four-letter exclamation. Unexpected pain, knee-jerk reaction, it’s on the tip of your tongue—I get it.

But professional profanity is a whole other ordeal.

Preconceived projections are what I’m talking about here. Blog posts, tweets, speeches, books; they’re all produced with forethought.

You plan out what you post, you prepare what speak, you have all the time in the world before your press publish, and yet you choose to curse intentionally.

If you want to make a name for yourself, write daily. Writing is where everything starts. Don’t like to write? It doesn’t matter. Even the great writers don’t always enjoy writing. Don’t have anything to say? It also doesn’t matter: You don’t write because you have something to say. You write to find out what you have to say.

For creative people like us, perfectionism is the bane of our existence. On the one hand, this obsession with perfection is what makes our work so good but on the other hand, it can be downright paralyzing.

You have good taste and high standards. That’s often why what you make frustrates you. You know that it’s not yet aligning with the image of perfection in your mind.

I share my formula for making perfectionism work for you instead of against you. The video is based off of a chapter of my book, The Overlap Technique.

Relationship marketing does work, but the difficulty is it also attracts freeloaders. Now, the fact that freeloaders exist is not the difficulty—there will always be freeloaders. The difficulty lies in struggling with your inner response to freeloaders.

Something a little different from usual. I’ve been working on setting up my new Mac Pro. It’s actually not so noticeable in the picture since it’s so small (which I like). But man, that thing packs a punch.

I’m doing a lot more heavy production work with my podcast and shooting and editing my weekly video show, and my old iMac was just beach balls all day—no good. It was time to step it up and get a machine that doesn’t have to think about what I need it to do.

Wow, does this thing deliver. I’m a power user, so I have a dozen+ items that I absolutely have to have in my startup. It was taking minutes to boot on my old machine. Now (with the same exact configuration), I enter my password and everything is fully loaded by the time I count to 2. Apps open in even less time. Amazing.

When your car breaks down on the way to an important event that begins in 1 hour, and roadside assistance is not going to make it in time, who do you call?

Your best friend.

Your best friend is always there for you. They’ve got your back. No matter what they have going on, no matter how busy they are, if you need them, they’re there. No questions asked.