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The year was 2013. Things were going very well. I was charging 5-figure rates with clients for my hand lettering and selling physical products with my designs every day.

But we need to roll back the clock a little bit further.

The year was 2010. I was designing websites for 8 to 10 hours a day. During my nights and weekends, I practiced hand lettering for 6 to 8 hours outside my day job. I did this every single day for years.

Yes, I really did spend 6 to 8 hours every day practicing hand lettering in addition to having a day job. No, I didn’t do anything else. I sacrificed everything. I dedicated my life to the craft because I enjoyed it. It wasn’t making me any money, but I thoroughly enjoyed every moment of pursuing it.

I created lettering for two years. Nearly every day I posted, nobody noticed in the first two years. Nobody cared.

Until they did.

Tomorrow is the big day. Learn Lettering 2.0 is launching on Monday! Everyone on the team is working around the clock preparing for the launch.

I got this question yesterday:

Is there any way you could let me know when I might be able to make the money back from paying for the class? Do you know an average turn around time? I know it will no doubt be worth every penny but just trying to figure things out!

I love this question. First of all, it highlights that Learn Lettering is an investment. It’s an investment in yourself and your career. I’ve poured a ton of blood, sweat, and tears into making this class worth well over 10x the price and I believe I’ve successfully done just that.

You absolutely are going to get a return on investment, but the question still remains: in how long?

It’s FAQ time! I’ve been getting a TON of questions about Learn Lettering after yesterday’s full lesson breakdown and reveal of launch prices. It’s understandable! The class launches on Monday and people are excited. I’m going to try to answer as many of the most common questions as I can today. Please feel free to  Continue Reading »

Have you done any client work with hand lettering yet? What about client work in general?

If you have, you can probably relate to what I’m about to share. If not, that is very good news because I can help you avoid so common pitfalls.

How many times have you quoted a price to a client for hand lettering only to have them come back and say, “I don’t think I can do that…”? They ask if you can do a little bit less and you’re seriously considering lowering your price so you don’t lose this job.

Or how about this one: you ask the client for a budget, they provide you a budget, you work on a quote that’s in the range of their original budget and maybe a little bit higher. You send this over to see if the client oh by. More often than not, it turns into a negotiation game. Does this sound familiar?

We’re 4 days out. Learn Lettering 2.0 launches on Monday, July 27th. Because you’re subscribed, you will be receiving free access to the Starter Class.

Of course, the Starter Class is just the beginning. Yes, it’s a TON of valuable videos (I charged $99 for even fewer modules last year than what I’m giving you for free), but it’s just the beginning.

Yesterday, I shared an exhaustive list of all the modules and lessons inside the Master Class with you.

This is a contextual education that is not just showing you how to draw letters, but giving you the confidence to work with clients and pursue lettering as a career. I show you exact emails with clients, I give you contract templates, I teach you how to price with confidence, I share insights on selling and marketing products so you don’t launch to crickets.

You’re not going to find this with any other lettering class. It is in-depth, high quality, professionalism-focused, and people are seeing real results from it.

The countdown continues: just 5 days until Learn Lettering 2.0 launches!

It might not seem like type anatomy is relevant to lettering, but to improve, you have to be able to hold a conversation about letters.

When you get critiques on your work, others will be using these terms to talk about your lettering. Without these terms, it would be very difficult to pinpoint areas you need to work on.

Armed with an understanding of terminology, you’ll be able to follow conversations on lettering and improve your work!

We’re just six days out from the launch of Learn Lettering 2.0.

As promised, I have an exclusive, full-length video from the Master Class for you today. It’s the very first of the new Learn Lettering 2.0 lessons to be shared publicly.

I hope you enjoy it. There’s 70 more videos lessons like this in the Master Class.

I want to show you how I digitized a letterpress coaster design.

In this video, I take you step-by-step through the digitization process going from sketch to vector. I show you my software workflow, shortcuts, and even get into Pantone coloring and preparing files for a printer.

Whether you’re working on a project for fun, creating your own products and working with manufacturers, or digitizing lettering for a client project, this video will give you a TON of insights.

I guarantee even seasoned pros will find a gold nugget in this video that will save you a ton of time alone. it’s just chock-full of process insights and tips.

It’s Sunday. You have time to create, but eh… it’s the weekend.

You’re chill right now. It’s lazy. You’ve got the whole week ahead of you. You can always start tomorrow, right? Monday. Yeah, Monday sounds good. You’ll start tomorrow.

“I’ll create something new tomorrow.”

I’ll do it when my new pens come in.
I’ll make something when I have inspiration.
I’ll start when Sean’s classes launch on July 27th.
I’ll share my creations once I know I’m “good enough.”
I want to stop you right there. Tomorrow never comes. If you don’t do it today, you’re wasting your time.

There is today and there is never. Tomorrow is never.

I love hand lettering. The industry is experiencing a tremendous amount of growth, which is super exciting. With that growth has come a ton of questions! In the past few months alone, I’ve received many hundreds of emails from hand lettering artists sharing their biggest struggles. I’m addressing the most common challenges and producing a  Continue Reading »

I have a confession to make. When I was first getting into hand lettering, I saw every other hand letterer as my competition.

Essentially, I thought, “Oh, they’re doing the same thing I’m doing and they’re trying to get the same kind of work I am, so I guess they’re the enemy!”

But this is such a sad way of thinking. I’m embarrassed to even share that with you now years later, but I know I’m not alone in dealing with these feelings.

What I realized was these people were not my competition, they were my community.

We’re on the third part of our mini series on The Trifecta. The Trifecta is how you can make a living as a hand lettering artist (here’s Part 1 and Part 2 if you missed them).

What a lot of people assume is that in order to make a living at something, their income must all come from one source. But you can be a lot more creative than that.

Sure, it’s great to have a significant amount of revenue coming from one source consistently, and that’s certainly a goal, but ideally you want to diversified. That way if one source of income slows down, you’re not completely out of luck.

My hope with this series is to get you thinking about the different ways that you can make money beyond just working with clients.

Welcome back to Part 2 of our series on The Trifecta. Yesterday, we talked about making a living with client work.

The Trifecta is the three ways you’re able to make money with hand lettering:
1. Client Work
2. Products

The reason I recommend products as your second stream of revenue (as opposed to your first) is because they are a longer term investment. With client work, you can do a project and get paid, but with products, you need to put money in and wait before you get something out. Even then, it can be awhile before you’re profitable.

When it comes to hand lettering, you can obviously make whatever products you like. I’ve seen people have the most success with prints and t-shirts, but the sky’s the limit.

Is it really possible to make a living as a hand lettering artist?

You have no idea how excited I am about this little mini series I’m about to share with you!

Over the next few days, I’ll be showing you a total of three ways you can make money with hand lettering. I call this The Trifecta.

While we’ll be talking about The Trifecta as it pertains to hand lettering, it really applies to any pursuit you have. The three methods of generating revenue are…

So you want to create something original. You’re looking for inspiration, but also you’re very conscious of avoiding ripping someone off.

This is good! I want to commend you for wanting to create something original. A lot of new hand letterers don’t realize that they shouldn’t copy others’ works and post them as their own.

This doesn’t mean you can’t copy for practice, but it’s important to note that you shouldn’t ever publish derivative works.

For instance, you can copy some hand lettering you found in a Google Image search or on Pinterest, but you should not post this on your Instagram. Even if you say it’s “inspired” it’s still infringing upon the original artist.

This makes things a bit tricky. After all, how can you get better if you don’t look at great works that have been made before you? Where can you find inspiration if you always run the risk of copying?

I’m right handed. But I get a lot of left-handers writing in about things like smudged ink struggles due to drawing from left to right. I thought I’d bring in someone knowledgeable about the matter.

Today, I invited my friend, Winston Scully, to help provide some help and insight for left-handers in this short interview. He answers some of the common questions I get from left-handers.

Right-handers with an open mind will get something out of this too.